Search

of ceiling wax

reading YA, graphic novels and the spaces in between

Month

July 2016

starting now

“It’s times like this I miss speaking the most, these random, meaningless conversations that could go anywhere.”

The Things I Didn’t Say by Kylie Fornasier (Pengin, 2016) is a powerful story about the difficulties of finding a voice when silence is a daily struggle.

Piper has selective mutism. She can’t talk when people other than her immediate family or close friends, are present. She’s battled her silence her whole life – with therapy, understanding teachers and the support of her family.

Continue reading “starting now”

inky words

This year’s 2017 Inky Awards Longlist is here

The Inky Awards Longlist came out in March and some of my fav books of the past year were included. The Shortlist will be announced next month and I’m looking forward to seeing what makes it.

Clancy of the Undertow

Continue reading “inky words”

the glittering court

“Locked in a glittering cage that so many admired, little knowing it was suffocating me.”

The Glittering Court by Richelle Mead is getting slammed on Goodreads and round about. I liked it, perhaps because I listened to it on a long drive (seven hours x 2), have never read Richelle Mead before and had no expectations whatsoever. (And I haven’t read similarly themed The Selection by Kiera Cass.) I couldn’t even remember the blurb when I started, but had a vague recollection of negativity I read somewhere.

Continue reading “the glittering court”

life in poetry

“She thought she was running toward home, but she was mistaken. She ran until she was dead tired.”

It’s been too long since I read a verse novel. Ask Me How I Got Here by Christine Heppermann (Greenwillow Books, 2016) reminded me of my love for them. As lyrical as it is heart-breaking, everything I could ask for in radiant words.

Continue reading “life in poetry”

the protected

“She would be pissed off about me invading her space, I’m sure. But she is gone, completely and utterly not here.”

The Protected by Claire Zorn (UQP, 2014) won last year’s CBCA Book of The Year Older Readers and was shortlisted for the 2015 Inky Award and 2016 WA Premier’s Book Awards. I only just read it because I disliked her first book The Sky So Heavy and never finished it. I’m glad I realised my mistake and tried Claire Zorn again.

Continue reading “the protected”

girl you’ll be a woman soon

“The sun dips toward the horizon and the wind blows cold over the waves, as the sky blazes red and darkness gathers around the girls, neither of them knowing how little time they have left before the fire goes out.”

Note: this has spoilers

After finishing Girls on Fire (HarperCollins, 2016) I was surprised to discover this is Robin Wasserman’s first book for adults. I assumed it was YA because that’s where my library shelved it and I think it’s YA. I wonder if the sex makes the prudish mainstream US publishing industry think it won’t sell as YA. Don’t they know teenagers have sex?

Continue reading “girl you’ll be a woman soon”

the flywheel

The Flywheel by Erin Gough (Hardie Grant Egmont, 2015) was shortlisted for the CBCA Book of The Year Older Readers 2016 and longlisted for the Inky Award 2016. Did it made the Inky longlist due to cameos from the Marx Brothers?

“Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.”

Continue reading “the flywheel”

writing while white

In Australia this week is NAIDOC Week, when we celebrate the rich culture of Indigenous Australians. The beautiful artwork of the poster is by Wiradjuri Aboriginal artist Lani Balzan.

2016 National NAIDOC Poster

Meanwhile J.K. Rowling continues to ignore discussion of her appropriation of Native American culture for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and the latest installment “Ilvermorny School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.”

Continue reading “writing while white”

the day the music died

“Never be sorry, never be frightened, never be careful – those were the rules of Lacey. Play by the rules, win the game: Never be alone.”

I agree with Girls on Fire by Robin Wasserman (HarperCollins, 2016), the Cure is the universal cure for all that ails us. Just reliving my teenage years over here. You know you’re old when you experienced the time of historical fiction! Ok so my highschool years weren’t quite as action packed, but The Screaming Trees, Urge Overkill, Sonic Youth and Kurt were the soundtrack to my soul. And River Phoenix had my besotted heart somewhere between Sneakers and My Own Private Idaho.
Continue reading “the day the music died”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑