Search

of ceiling wax and other things

reading YA, graphic novels and the spaces in between

forgetting yourself

Unbecoming by Jenny Downham (David Fickling Books, 2015)

How Not to Disappear by Clare Furniss (Simon & Schuster, 2016)

Forgetting Foster by Dianne Touchell (Allen & Unwin, 2016)

I recently read these three books featuring a character with Alzheimer’s disease. Unbecoming and Forgetting Foster were both for my book group. I only just finished Unbecoming, a year later!? Fellow book groupers know more about the condition because they’ve cared for family members with it. Karen told us a person can die from it, which I never knew.

Continue reading “forgetting yourself”

how not to disappear

How Not to Disappear

I’ve been reading so many books about memory lately – The Leaving, Unbecoming, and How Not to Disappear by Clare Furniss (Simon & Schuster, 2016). An unexpected favourite from the past year – so much more than I thought it would be.

“Oh and by the way, you know how we accidently had sex a month ago? Turns out I’m pregnant.”

Continue reading “how not to disappear”

when androids dream of getting laid

Some might say this has spoilers, but is predictable writing spoilery?

Echo Boy by Matt Haig (Random House, 2014) is a somewhat predictable romance with sci-fi action and adventure thrown in. I knew from the first that Echo Boy of the title would be breaking hearts. I listened to the audio book on my commute and it was a good way to pass the time.

Continue reading “when androids dream of getting laid”

words in deep blue

“The past is with me; the present is here. The future is unmapped and changeable. Ours for the imagining: spreading out before us. Sunlight filled, deep blue, and the darkness.”

Cath Crowley’s Words in Deep Blue is a love letter to books and reading, the counterpoint to Graffiti Moon, a love letter to Art. Who wouldn’t love a story set in a second hand bookstore, starring a library of love letters secreted within the pages of beloved books.

Continue reading “words in deep blue”

the downward spiral of the boundless sublime

The Boundless Sublime by Lili Wilkinson (Allen & Unwin, 2016) is harrowing, not quite the sweetness and light of her previous books. Lili Wilkinson used to be my go-to for fluffy romance, motherhood has changed her.

Continue reading “the downward spiral of the boundless sublime”

when multiple POVs read the same

This year I read two books with multiple points of view and was disappointed in both at the sameness of the voices. Perhaps the shear scale of each let them down: seven and five POVs is a lot to juggle.

Continue reading “when multiple POVs read the same”

words in deep sorrow

“In my memories, he’s alive, so I can’t make my brain compute the information that I’ll never see him again.”

Reading Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley reminds me of when I read Graffiti Moon. How much I loved it, how much I wanted to be in Melbourne at night, bombing with Cropley. He was living there by that time and a few months later, on his last night, we talked for hours on the phone. That’s what he was doing and I felt like I was by his side. Continue reading “words in deep sorrow”

Green Valentine

“And that’s what you want to do, right? Make the world better. Well this is how I think we should do it. We’ll be like superheroes – sneaking around at night bringing Valentine to life. You were right about changing things. We should be doing everything we can.”

Green Valentine by Lili Wilkinson (Allen & Unwin, 2015) was longlisted for the Inky Award 2016. I borrowed it from the library and while reading, the shortlist was announced. It’s in the final five in contention for the Gold Inky. If you’re teenaged you can vote for your fav. (Lili Wilkinson founded the Inky Awards a decade ago.)

Continue reading “Green Valentine”

untimely death

I found Darkwater by Georgia Blain (Random House, 2010) at the library after reading Special. Darkwater is a very different story, but Blain’s writing is exceptional as always. Despite my love for the book, I’m having trouble writing about it. Perhaps due to my cousin and my state of mind around murder, but here goes.

Continue reading “untimely death”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑