Search

of ceiling wax and other things

reading YA, graphic novels and the spaces in between

Tag

childrens books

Sister Heart

“Somewhere
behind the wind
at the back of the sea
is my country”

I finally read the wonderfully lyrical Sister Heart by Sally Morgan (Fremantle Press, 2015). More verse novel love and deserving of all the award love. But the judges are confused: shortlisted for the CBCA Book of The Year Younger Readers 2016 and longlisted for the (YA) Inky Award 2016. I’m not confused, just heart drowned

“lost
lost
lost
in my saltwater tears”

Continue reading “Sister Heart”

finding love in the graveyard

“The cemetery was full of dead people. It had always been that way, since long before Magrit had come to live here.”

Magrit by Lee Battersby (Walker Books, 2016) is a creepy delight, with just the right amount of “awful, ugly, terrible.”

Continue reading “finding love in the graveyard”

the river and the book

The River and The Book by Alison Croggon

Note: this has some spoilers

“I watched as the stars faded and the landscape began to materialize out of the night and become solid again, and the rim of the world grew rose-pink and deepened to orange and then split with molten gold, and the first rays of the sun speared the wide, empty plains.”

The River and The Book by Alison Croggon is another long-listed for the Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year for Older Readers 2016. Perhaps I should blog about this book by the shores of a river, at least I have a cat by my side. And there are spoilers here, cats always ruin things.

Continue reading “the river and the book”

Magabala Books

I read Ambelin Kwaymullina’s guest blog post “What teachers and school librarians can do to support Indigenous books” and she mentions Indigenous publisher Magabala Books which publishes many children’s and YA books. I particularly like their picture books, because PICTURES…

Continue reading “Magabala Books”

The Grumpy Lighthouse Keeper

The Grumpy Lighthouse Keeper by Terrizita Corpus and Maggie Prewett

The Grumpy Lighthouse Keeper by Terrizita Corpus and Maggie Prewett (2011) is a delightful read-a-loud story with sumptuous illustrations dancing across the pages to match the rollicking story.

Continue reading “The Grumpy Lighthouse Keeper”

a single stone

A Single Stone by Meg McKinlay

“Seven girls nose to toe, wearing stone like skin as they made their way towards the harvest”

A Single Stone by Meg McKinlay is beautifully written, and raises disturbing questions in its dystopian world with parallels to our reality.

Continue reading “a single stone”

Wunambal Dreaming

Scaly-tailed Possum and Echidna

I found another book review I wrote four years ago! Sorry Magabala Books and the Goonack clan. In 2011 Scaly-Tailed Possum and Echidna by Cathy Goonack, with pictures by Marlene, Myron and Katrina Goonack was a Children’s Book Council of Australia Early Childhood Notable Book. I wrote this review then.
Continue reading “Wunambal Dreaming”

when finding an angel in the creek, run the other way

Sally Rippin is a talented artist and has many picture books to her name, including The Race for the Chinese Zodiac which has just been named by the Children’s Book Council of Australia as a Notable Picture Book for 2011. Congratulations! Sally Rippin’s talents extend to writing and Angel Creek is a delightful little read, perfect for a dreamy day down by the creek. Hopefully you won’t find an angel there. While you might think it would be delightful, it really wouldn’t.
Angel Creek by Sally Rippin

Continue reading “when finding an angel in the creek, run the other way”

Diana Wynne Jones and me

Diana as a child
Diana as a child

Vale Diana Wynne Jones 16 August 1934 – 26 March 2011

Only thin, weak thinkers despise fairy stories. Each one has a true, strange fact hidden in it, which you can find if you look – Fire and Hemlock (1985)

Diana with Dorabella
Diana with Dorabella

It’s been a month since Diana Wynne Jones’ sad passing. I haven’t read many of her books, but as a child and teenager what I read captivated my imagination and left lasting impressions into my adulthood. There was much internet writings on her passing and JudiJ compiled a useful list.

The Homeward Bounders by Diana Wynne Jones I met Diana Wynne Jones somewhere on the boundaries between worlds and she showed me some astounding places. I’m not sure when this was, sometime in the late 80s when I was 10 or 11. I visited those boundaries many times. It was one of the books I read over and over as a kid. I wanted to live there, hiding behind my hair, with an arm which may or may not have been inhabited by a demon. My boring existence didn’t even come close. Despite the innumerable times I read The Homeward Bounders, I couldn’t remember the title when I thought of it in the middle of a sleepless night the week after DWJ died (btw I wasn’t sleepless because of her death. I just get really bad insomnia sometimes). I do remember Prometheus living his painful day over and over, the shadowy strangers playing war games with real peoples’ lives, the dirty, nameless cities Jamie found himself in, no matter how many boundaries he crossed, and the constant fear of running from Them. [1]

That’s the trouble with boundaries you often don’t have time to catch your breath – The Homeward Bounders (1981)

Continue reading “Diana Wynne Jones and me”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑