Search

of ceiling wax and other things

reading YA, graphic novels and the spaces in between

Tag

grief

losing the main attraction

The Sidekicks by Will Kostakis (Penguin, 2016) is a powerful story. I finished it three months ago, but it still fills my thoughts. Well deserving of all the award love heaped its way. On the Notables for the CBCA Book of The Year Older Readers 2017, shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Award and longlisted for the Inky Awards 2017.

Continue reading “losing the main attraction”

boys behaving badly

“And I want to punch him, right there in his perfect pretty face, and give him some reason to remember I’m still here.”

Everything is Changed by Nova Weetman (UQP, 2016) is on the Notables for the CBCA Book of The Year Older Readers 2017. The story is amazing, not least because it’s told backwards. While I thought I knew exactly what was coming, I didn’t and surprises kept jumping out from the page.

Continue reading “boys behaving badly”

when androids dream of getting laid

Some might say this has spoilers, but is predictable writing spoilery?

Echo Boy by Matt Haig (Random House, 2014) is a somewhat predictable romance with sci-fi action and adventure thrown in. I knew from the first that Echo Boy of the title would be breaking hearts. I listened to the audio book on my commute and it was a good way to pass the time.

Continue reading “when androids dream of getting laid”

words in deep blue

“The past is with me; the present is here. The future is unmapped and changeable. Ours for the imagining: spreading out before us. Sunlight filled, deep blue, and the darkness.”

Cath Crowley’s Words in Deep Blue is a love letter to books and reading, the counterpoint to Graffiti Moon, a love letter to Art. Who wouldn’t love a story set in a second hand bookstore, starring a library of love letters secreted within the pages of beloved books.

Continue reading “words in deep blue”

the downward spiral of the boundless sublime

The Boundless Sublime by Lili Wilkinson (Allen & Unwin, 2016) is harrowing, not quite the sweetness and light of her previous books. Lili Wilkinson used to be my go-to for fluffy romance, motherhood has changed her.

Continue reading “the downward spiral of the boundless sublime”

words in deep sorrow

“In my memories, he’s alive, so I can’t make my brain compute the information that I’ll never see him again.”

Reading Words in Deep Blue by Cath Crowley reminds me of when I read Graffiti Moon. How much I loved it, how much I wanted to be in Melbourne at night, bombing with Cropley. He was living there by that time and a few months later, on his last night, we talked for hours on the phone. That’s what he was doing and I felt like I was by his side. Continue reading “words in deep sorrow”

untimely death

I found Darkwater by Georgia Blain (Random House, 2010) at the library after reading Special. Darkwater is a very different story, but Blain’s writing is exceptional as always. Despite my love for the book, I’m having trouble writing about it. Perhaps due to my cousin and my state of mind around murder, but here goes.

Continue reading “untimely death”

the protected

“She would be pissed off about me invading her space, I’m sure. But she is gone, completely and utterly not here.”

The Protected by Claire Zorn (UQP, 2014) won last year’s CBCA Book of The Year Older Readers and was shortlisted for the 2015 Inky Award and 2016 WA Premier’s Book Awards. I only just read it because I disliked her first book The Sky So Heavy and never finished it. I’m glad I realised my mistake and tried Claire Zorn again.

Continue reading “the protected”

the day the music died

“Never be sorry, never be frightened, never be careful – those were the rules of Lacey. Play by the rules, win the game: Never be alone.”

I agree with Girls on Fire by Robin Wasserman (HarperCollins, 2016), the Cure is the universal cure for all that ails us. Just reliving my teenage years over here. You know you’re old when you experienced the time of historical fiction! Ok so my highschool years weren’t quite as action packed, but The Screaming Trees, Urge Overkill, Sonic Youth and Kurt were the soundtrack to my soul. And River Phoenix had my besotted heart somewhere between Sneakers and My Own Private Idaho.
Continue reading “the day the music died”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑